Campaign Overview

What do we hope to achieve?

The Path to COP26 campaign aims to raise ambition and drive climate action.

The finance sector needs to act together to achieve decisive action at COP26. Through our 10 year+ expertise in ethical finance, established events programme, local knowledge and strong global network, our Path to COP26 campaign brings together stakeholders from across finance and beyond to raise ambition and drive climate action before, during and after COP26.

We are committed to making finance work for COP26, and COP26 work for finance.

Watch our Executive Manager, Chris Tait, outline the key aims of the campaign in a short video below.

Hear more about our campaign

100 Days to COP | Campaign Overview | Chris Tait

Watch GEFI’s Executive Manager Chris Tait outline our Path to COP Campaign, and why he is proud to welcome the world to Glasgow in November.

#PathToCOP26

The campaign will:


Connect

Provide a platform to connect and share knowledge, ideas and best practice.

Amplify

Engage with financial institutions and organisations to amplify the pressing need for climate action.

Accelerate

Assist the financial sector to accelerate practical efforts to tackle climate change by signing up to relevant agendas.

Related Content

Related Video Content

Radical Old Idea: The Future of Growth

How do we maintain hope in the face of climate despair?

Watch Prof. Tim Jackson, Director of CUSP | Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Prosperity for a Radical Old Idea conversation with Kaisie Rayner FRSA, Climate Change Lead at Royal London as part of GEFI’s Radical Old Idea Series.

"This is our last hope of keeping 1.5 degrees alive. Our best chance of building a brighter future. A future of green jobs and cleaner air. I have faith that world leaders will rise to the occasion and not be found wanting in their tryst with destiny."

Alok Sharma, COP26 President

"COP 26 in Glasgow is the last best chance the world has to come together in order to do the things we need to do to avoid the worst consequences of the climate crisis."

John Kerry, U.S. Special Presidential Envoy for Climate